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Posts tagged ‘cybersecurity’

How To Protect Healthcare IoT Devices In A Zero Trust World

  • Over 100M healthcare IoT devices are installed worldwide today, growing to 161M by 2020, attaining a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 17.2% in just three years according to Statista.
  • Healthcare executives say privacy concerns (59%), legacy system integration (55%) and security concerns (54%) are the top three barriers holding back Internet of Things (IoT) adoption in healthcare organizations today according to the Accenture 2017 Internet of Health Things Survey.
  • The global IoT market is projected to soar from $249B in 2018 to $457B in 2020, attaining a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 22.4% in just three years according to Statista.

Healthcare and medical device manufacturers are in a race to see who can create the smartest and most-connected IoT devices first. Capitalizing on the rich real-time data monitoring streams these devices can provide, many see the opportunity to break free of product sales and move into more lucrative digital service business models. According to Capgemini’s “Digital Engineering, The new growth engine for discrete manufacturers,” the global market for smart, connected products is projected to be worth $519B to $685B by 2020. The study can be downloaded here (PDF, 40 pp., no opt-in). 47% of a typical manufacturer’s product portfolio by 2020 will be comprised of smart, connected products. In the gold rush to new digital services, data security needs to be a primary design goal that protects the patients these machines are designed to serve. The following graphic from the study shows how organizations producing smart, connected products are making use of the data generated today.

Healthcare IoT Device Data Doesn’t Belong For Sale On The Dark Web

Every healthcare IoT device from insulin pumps and diagnostic equipment to Remote Patient Monitoring is a potential attack surface for cyber adversaries to exploit. And the healthcare industry is renowned for having the majority of system breaches initiated by insiders. 58% of healthcare systems breach attempts involve inside actors, which makes this the leading industry for insider threats today according to Verizon’s 2018 Protected Health Information Data Breach Report (PHIDBR).

Many employees working for medical providers are paid modest salaries and often have to regularly work hours of overtime to make ends meet. Stealing and selling medical records is one of the ways those facing financial challenges look to make side money quickly and discreetly. And with a market on the Dark Web willing to pay up to $1,000 or more for the most detailed healthcare data, according to Experian, medical employees have an always-on, 24/7 marketplace to sell stolen data. 18% of healthcare employees are willing to sell confidential data to unauthorized parties for as little as $500 to $1,000, and 24% of employees know of someone who has sold privileged credentials to outsiders, according to a recent Accenture survey. Healthcare IoT devices are a potential treasure trove to inside and outside actors who are after financial gains by hacking the IoT connections to smart, connected devices and the networks they are installed on to exfiltrate valuable medical data.

Healthcare and medical device manufacturers need to start taking action now to secure these devices during the research and development, design and engineering phases of their next generation of IoT products. Specifying and validating that every IoT access point is compatible and can scale to support Zero Trust Security (ZTS) is essential if the network of devices being designed and sold will be secure. ZTS is proving to be very effective at thwarting potential breach attempts across every threat surface an organization has. Its four core pillars include verifying the identity of every user, validating every device, limiting access and privilege, and utilizing machine learning to analyze user behavior and gain greater insights from analytics.

The First Step Is Protect Development Environments With Zero Trust Privilege

Product research & development, design, and engineering systems are all attack surfaces that cyber adversaries are looking to exploit as part of the modern threatscape. Their goals include gaining access to valuable Intellectual Property (IP), patents and designs that can be sold to competitors and on the Dark Web, or damaging and destroying development data to slow down the development of new products. Another tactic lies in planting malware in the firmware of IoT devices to exfiltrate data at scale.

Attack surfaces and the identities that comprise the new security perimeter of their companies aren’t just people; they are workloads, services, machines, and development systems and platforms. Protecting every attack surface with cloud-ready Zero Trust Privilege (ZTP) which secures access to infrastructure, DevOps, cloud, containers, Big Data, and the entire development and production environment is needed.

Zero Trust Privilege can harden healthcare and medical device manufacturers’ internal security, only granting least privilege access based on verifying who is requesting access, the context of the request, and the risk of the access environment. By implementing least privilege access, healthcare and medical device manufacturers would be able to minimize attack surfaces, improve audit and compliance visibility, and reduces risk, complexity, and costs across their development and production operations.

The Best Security Test Of All: An FDA Audit

Regulatory agencies across Asia, Europe, and North America are placing a higher priority than ever before on cybersecurity to the device level. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration’s Cybersecurity Initiative is one of the most comprehensive, providing prescriptive guidance to manufacturers on how to attain higher levels of cybersecurity in their products.

During a recent healthcare device and medical device manufacturer’s conference, a former FDA auditor (and now Vice President of Compliance) gave a fascinating keynote on the FDA’s intent to audit medical device security at the production level. Security had been an afterthought or at best a “trust but verify” approach that relied on trusted versus untrusted machine domains. That will no longer be the case, as the FDA will now complete audits that are comparable to Zero Trust across manufacturing operations and devices.

As Zero Trust Privilege enables greater auditability than has been possible in the past, combined with a “never trust, always verify” approach to system access, healthcare device, and medical products manufacturers should start engineering in Zero Trust into their development cycles now.

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IBM’s 2018 Data Breach Study Shows Why We’re In A Zero Trust World Now

  • Digital businesses that lost less than 1% of their customers due to a data breach incurred a cost of $2.8M, and if 4% or more were lost the cost soared to $6M.
  • U.S. based breaches are the most expensive globally, costing on average $7.91M with the highest global notification cost as well, $740,000.
  • A typical data breach costs a company $3.86M, up 6.4% from $3.62M last year.
  • Digital businesses that have security automation can minimize the costs of breaches by $1.55M versus those businesses who are not ($2.88M versus $4.43M).
  • 48% of all breaches are initiated by malicious or criminal attacks.
  • Mean-time-to-identify (MTTI) a breach is 197 days, and the mean-time-to-contain (MTTC) is 69 days.

These and many other insights into the escalating costs of security breaches are from the 2018 Cost of a Data Breach Study sponsored by IBM Security with research independently conducted by Ponemon Institute LLC. The report is downloadable here (PDF, 47 pp. no opt-in).

The study is based on interviews with more than 2,200 compliance, data protection and IT professionals from 477 companies located in 15 countries and regions globally who have experienced a data breach in the last 12 months. This is the first year the use of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies and security automation are included in the study. The study also defines mega breaches as those involving over 1 million records and costing $40M or more. Please see pages 5, 6 and 7 of the study for specifics on the methodology.

The report is a quick read and the data provided is fascinating. One can’t help but reflect on how legacy security technologies designed to protect digital businesses decades ago isn’t keeping up with the scale, speed and sophistication of today’s breach attempts. The most common threat surface attacked is compromised privileged credential access. 81% of all breaches exploit identity according to an excellent study from Centrify and Dow Jones Customer Intelligence, CEO Disconnect is Weakening Cybersecurity (31 pp, PDF, opt-in).

The bottom line from the IBM, Centrify and many other studies is that we’re in a Zero Trust Security (ZTS) world now and the sooner a digital business can excel at it, the more protected they will be from security threats. ZTS begins with Next-Gen Access (NGA) by recognizing that every employee’s identity is the new security perimeter for any digital business.

Key takeaways from the study include the following:

  • U.S. based breaches are the most expensive globally, costing on average $7.91M, more than double the global average of $3.86M. Nations in the Middle East have the second-most expensive breaches globally, averaging $5.31M, followed by Canada, where the average breach costs a digital business $4.74M. Globally a breach costs a digital business $3.86M this year, up from $3.62M last year. With the costs of breaches escalating so quickly and the cost of a breach in the U.S. leading all nations and outdistancing the global average 2X, it’s time for more digital businesses to consider a Zero Trust Security strategy. See Forrester Principal Analyst Chase Cunningham’s recent blog post What ZTX Means For Vendors And Users, from the Forrester Research blog for where to get started.

  • The number of breached records is soaring in the U.S., the 3rd leading nation of breached records, 6,850 records above the global average. The Ponemon Institute found that the average size of a data breach increased 2.2% this year, with the U.S. leading all nations in breached records. It now takes an average of 266 days to identify and contain a breach (Mean-time-to-identify (MTTI) a breach is 197 days and the mean-time-to-contain (MTTC) is 69 days), so more digital businesses in the Middle East, India, and the U.S. should consider reorienting their security strategies to a Zero Trust Security Model.

  • French and U.S. digital businesses pay a heavy price in customer churn when a breach happens, among the highest in the world. The following graphic compares abnormally high customer churn rates, the size of the data breach, average total cost, and per capita costs by country.

  • U.S. companies lead the world in lost business caused by a security breach with $4.2M lost per incident, over $2M more than digital businesses from the Middle East. Ponemon found that U.S. digitally-based businesses pay an exceptionally high cost for customer churn caused by a data breaches. Factors contributing to the high cost of lost business include abnormally high turnover of customers, the high costs of acquiring new customers in the U.S., loss of brand reputation and goodwill. U.S. customers also have a myriad of competitive options and their loyalty is more difficult to preserve. The study finds that thanks to current notification laws, customers have a greater awareness of data breaches and have higher expectations regarding how the companies they are loyal to will protect customer records and data.

Conclusion

The IBM study foreshadows an increasing level of speed, scale, and sophistication when it comes to how breaches are orchestrated. With the average breach globally costing $4.36M and breach costs and lost customer revenue soaring in the U.S,. it’s clear we’re living in a world where Zero Trust should be the new mandate.

Zero Trust Security starts with Next-Gen Access to secure every endpoint and attack surface a digital business relies on for daily operations, and limit access and privilege to protect the “keys to the kingdom,” which gives hackers the most leverage. Security software providers including Centrify are applying advanced analytics and machine learning to thwart breaches and many other forms of attacks that seek to exploit weak credentials and too much privilege. Zero Trust is a proven way to stay at parity or ahead of escalating threats.

Zero Trust Security Update From The SecurIT Zero Trust Summit

  • Identities, not systems, are the new security perimeter for any digital business, with 81% of breaches involving weak, default or stolen passwords.
  • 53% of enterprises feel they are more susceptible to threats since 2015.
  • 51% of enterprises suffered at least one breach in the past 12 months and malicious insider incidents increased 11% year-over-year.

These and many other fascinating insights are from SecurIT: the Zero Trust Summit for CIOs and CISOs held last month in San Francisco, CA. CIO and CSO produced the event that included informative discussions and panels on how enterprises are adopting Next-Gen Access (NGA) and enabling Zero Trust Security (ZTS). What made the event noteworthy were the insights gained from presentations and panels where senior IT executives from Akamai, Centrify, Cisco, Cylance, EdgeWise, Fortinet, Intel, Live Nation Entertainment and YapStone shared their key insights and lessons learned from implementing Zero Trust Security.

Zero Trust’s creator is John Kindervag, a former Forrester Analyst, and Field CTO at Palo Alto Networks.  Zero Trust Security is predicated on the concept that an organization doesn’t trust anything inside or outside its boundaries and instead verifies anything and everything before granting access. Please see Dr. Chase Cunningham’s excellent recent blog post, What ZTX means for vendors and users, for an overview of the current state of ZTS. Dr. Chase Cunningham is a Principal Analyst at Forrester.

Key takeaways from the Zero Trust Summit include the following:

  • Identities, not systems, are the new security perimeter for any digital business, with 81% of breaches involving weak, default or stolen passwords. Tom Kemp, Co-Founder, and CEO, Centrify, provided key insights into the current state of enterprise IT security and how existing methods aren’t scaling completely enough to protect every application, endpoint, and infrastructure of any digital business. He illustrated how $86B was spent on cybersecurity, yet a stunning 66% of companies were still breached. Companies targeted for breaches averaged five or more separate breaches already. The following graphic underscores how identities are the new enterprise perimeter, making NGA and ZTS a must-have for any digital business.

  • 53% of enterprises feel they are more susceptible to threats since 2015. Chase Cunningham’s presentation, Zero Trust and Why Does It Matter, provided insights into the threat landscape and a thorough definition of ZTX, which is the application of a Zero Trust framework to an enterprise. Dr. Cunningham is a Principal Analyst at Forrester Research serving security and risk professionals. Forrester found the percentage of enterprises who feel they are more susceptible to threats nearly doubled in two years, jumping from 28% in 2015 to 53% in 2017. Dr. Cunningham provided examples of how breaches have immediate financial implications on the market value of any business with specific focus on the Equifax breach.

Presented by Dr. Cunningham during SecurIT: the Zero Trust Summit for CIOs and CISOs

  • 51% of enterprises suffered at least one breach in the past 12 months and malicious insider incidents increased 11% year-over-year. 43% of confirmed breaches in the last 12 months are from an external attack, 24% from internal attacks, 17% are from third-party incidents and 16% from lost or stolen assets. Consistent with Verizon’s 2018 Data Breach Investigations Report use of privileged credential access is a leading cause of breaches today.

Presented by Dr. Cunningham during SecurIT: the Zero Trust Summit for CIOs and CISOs

                       

  • One of Zero Trust Security’s innate strengths is the ability to flex and protect the perimeter of any growing digital business at the individual level, encompassing workforce, customers, distributors, and Akamai, Cisco, EdgeWise, Fortinet, Intel, Live Nation Entertainment and YapStone each provided examples of how their organizations are relying on NGA to enable ZTS enterprise-wide. Every speaker provided examples of how ZTS delivers several key benefits including the following: First, ZTS reduces the time to breach detection and improves visibility throughout a network. Second, organizations provided examples of how ZTS is reducing capital and operational expenses for security, in addition to reducing the scope and cost of compliance initiatives. All companies presenting at the conference provided examples of how ZTS is enabling greater data awareness and insight, eliminating inter-silo finger-pointing over security responsibilities and for several, enabling digital business transformation. Every organization is also seeing ZTS thwart the exfiltration and destruction of their data.

Conclusion

The SecurIT: the Zero Trust Summit for CIOs and CISOs event encapsulated the latest advances in how NGA is enabling ZTS by having enterprises who are adopting the framework share their insights and lessons learned. It’s fascinating to see how Akamai, Cisco, Intel, Live Nation Entertainment, YapStone, and others are tailoring ZTS to their specific customer-driven goals. Each also shared their plans for growth and how security in general and NGA and ZTS specifically are protecting customer and company data to ensure growth continues, uninterrupted.

 

 

How Machine Learning Quantifies Trust & Improves Employee Experiences

Bottom Line: By enabling enterprises to scale security with user behavior-based, contextual intelligence, Next-Gen Access strategies are delivering Zero Trust Security (ZTS) enterprise-wide, enabling the fastest companies to keep growing strong.

Every digital business is facing a security paradox today created by their proliferating amount of applications, endpoints and infrastructure on the one hand and the need to scale enterprise security without reducing the quality of user experiences on the other. Businesses face a continual series of challenges to growth, the majority of which are scale-based. Scaling security takes a multidimensional approach that accurately interprets user behavior, risk and threat predictions, and assesses data use and access patterns.

How Enterprises Are Solving The Security Paradox With Next-Gen Access

Security defies simple, scale-based solutions because its processes are ingrained in many different systems across a company. Each of the many systems security relies on and protects have their cadence, speed, and scale. When a company is growing fast, core systems including accounting, CRM, finance, pricing, sales, services, supply chain and human resources become security-constrained. It’s common for companies experiencing high growth to choose expediency over security. 32% of enterprises are sacrificing security for expediency and business performance, leaving many areas of their core infrastructure unsecured according to the Verizon Mobile Security Index 2018 Report.

The hard reality for any growing business is the faster they grow; the more sophisticated and strong they need to become at security. Protecting intellectual property (IP), all data assets and eradicating threats assures uninterrupted, profitable growth. Adding new suppliers, sales teams, distribution partners and service centers can’t be slowed down by legacy-based approaches to user authentication and system access.  The challenge is the faster a business is growing, the slower its legacy approaches to security reacts, slowing down sales cycles, supplier qualifications, and pipelines.

Next-Gen Access solves the security paradox of fast-growing businesses, enabling Zero Trust Security (ZTS) enterprise-wide by solving the following major challenges of a high growth business:

  1. Quit relying on brute-force Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) techniques that deliver mediocre user experiences and slow down productivity. Any company can still attain Zero Trust Security (ZTS) without reverting to brute-force approaches to MFA. Get away from the idea of having MFA challenges be for every user on every device they use to access every resource. Instead look to Next-Gen Access (NGA) to quantify context, device, and behavioral patterns and derive risk scores for each user.
  2. Begin to rely on Next-Gen Access, Risk-Aware MFA, and Risk Scores to quantify trust and set the foundation of a Zero Trust Security (ZTS) enterprise-wide strategies. The goal is to keep growth going strong, uninterrupted by any security event or breach. Next-Gen Access (NGA) provides behavioral, contextual intelligence indexed as a risk score for each user, enabling more secure and efficient user experiences. NGA is built on a platform that includes Identity-as-a-Service (IDaaS), Enterprise Mobility Management (EMM) and Privileged Access Management (PAM). They are also the essential components for creating and fine-tuning Zero Trust Security (ZTS) across fast-growing businesses. Taken together in a concerted strategy, ZTS delivers greater control and visibility over every resource in a company.
  3. Identify potential security risks on a per-user basis to the device level and limiting access while asking for identity verification without impacting user experiences. NGA takes contextual and user intelligence into account when deciding which resources will be available to a given user based on their previous login and system use actions and behaviors quantified in their risk score. Machine learning algorithms are used to find patterns in user behavior that could signal a potential security risk. Based on the risk score, conditional access is provided or not. All of this is done in seconds and doesn’t impact the user experience.
  4. Rely on more NGA that learns user’s behavioral patterns over time and improves the user experience, scaling Zero Trust Security enterprise-wide. Solving the paradox of scaling security in fast-growing companies needs to start with a machine learning-based approach to finding and acting on user’s behavioral and contextual activity. As NGA “learns” how valid users interact with security, updating risk scores and performing identity verification, the quality of a user’s experience improves. In fast-growing companies adding new employees, partners, and suppliers, this is invaluable as every new user will generate a risk score. Quantifying trust using NGA, the foundation of any ZTS strategy makes fast, secure profitable growth possible.
  5. The era of ZTS has arrived, and it is accentuating the importance of partnering with security providers who excel at offering Next-Gen Access solutions. ZTS will continue to revolutionize every aspect of an organization’s security strategy, enabling digital businesses to grow faster and more securely over time. Next-Gen Access solutions are the foundations enabling enterprises to scale ZTS strategies across their businesses. Key Next-Gen access providers enabling the era of ZTS include Palo Alto Networks for firewalls and Centrify for Access. Over the next 18 months, ZTS will redefine the cybersecurity landscape as digital businesses look to Next-Gen Access solutions to securely scale their companies and grow.
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