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Infographics Provide Varying Perspectives of the Cloud Computing Landscape

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The best infographics simplify complex data and make it instantly intuitive, which makes this form of presentation ideal for cloud computing and its related topics.  The following three infographics of the cloud computing landscape each explain its core concepts and market dynamics from a completely different vantage point.   I found these over on Alex William’s post on ReadWrite Cloud titled 3 Infographics About Cloud Computing.

The company who provided this first infographic is Zenoss, a provider of cloud monitoring tools and services. The infographic does a great job of supporting their unique value proposition and position in the market – and delivers some excellent market data in the process.

This is one of the more data-rich infographics on the cloud computing landscape in the enterprise.  It’s from Cloud Hypermarket out of the UK.  This company offers a £250 Start Up Service for anyone wanting to launch a cloud-based company with them.

This very well-known and popular infographic is from Wikibon, a community of IT professionals who generate excellent content across a range of subject areas.  They are worth checking out and following either through RSS feeds from their blog or on Facebook and Twitter.

Mark Russinovich on Windows Azure, Cloud Operating Systems and Platform as a Service

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Mark Russinovich is a Technical Fellow working on the Windows Azure team and is considered one of the leading experts on its architecture.   He is currently working on the Windows Azure Fabric Controller, which handles kernel-level tasks for the platform.   He explains the functions of the Fabric Controller in detail during the following video, illustrating concepts with references to data centers and legacy Microsoft operating systems.

Windows Azure:  Platform as a Service

This discussion also highlights how Windows Azure is being designed to scale for HPC-based instances and applications.  At 45 minutes, this is a great overview of the latest status on Windows Azure platform development from one of the leading software architects at Microsoft.   Despite how technical the discussion becomes at times, Mark Russinovich does a great job of referring back to what it means to data center requirements and simplifying complex concepts through examples.

Source attribution: http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Going+Deep/Mark-Russinovich-Windows-Azure-Cloud-Operating-Systems-and-Platform-as-a-Service

Cloud Computing’s Impact on the Channel

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IDC’s Chris Ilg, Director of Market Research, Infrastructure, Channels and Alliance discusses the impact the cloud will have on the channel moving forward.

Key points Chris makes during this video include the following:

  • Resellers see private clouds as a great opportunity for value-added services and many are making the shift away from selling purely hardware as a result.
  • Public Cloud Services providers are actively recruiting resellers as there is a land grab for market share right now.
  • Professional Services is the greatest profit opportunity, with the reseller being the trusted advisor to move applications into the cloud and provide legacy system integration.
  • Resellers need to move away from hardware and software margins now to stay financially viable; IDC surveys show a short runway to the move to services before a reseller shakeout begins.
  • Converged architectures and convergent infrastructures are acting to disintermediate resellers in the short term according to IDC.
  • Emerging opportunities for resellers today include unified communications and collaboration, mobile computing including tablets, security services and consulting, and digital signage.
  • Distributors need to get beyond their traditional role of pick, pack, and ship operations and become knowledge leaders for the channel, delivering strategic services in the process.  Providing guidance to resellers on how to make the transition to cloud services is critical.
  • Vendor partner programs can be confusing and difficult to navigate.  Distributors need to be the leaders on these programs, especially on certifications and specializations on behalf of resellers.
  • Solutions Distributor is a term being used more and more as these businesses seek to differentiate from their traditional logistics and pick, pack and ship operations. Ingram Micro and Tech Data investing in advanced technologies divisions that set the foundation for services selling by resellers are cases in point.  The goal of these divisions is to call at high levels in enterprises and sell services and programs that can scale across an entire business instead of just selling hardware or software.
  • M&A activity is picking up in distribution to attain global reach and set the foundation for future Cloud Services selling.

Web 2.0 Summit 2010 Point of Control: The Cloud

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O’Reilly Media and UBM TechNet sponsored the Web 2.0 Summit 2010 held in San Francisco from November 15th to 19th.  This event has become one of the premier conferences globally due to the quality of the content and speakers it attracts, and the thought leadership of the concepts presented there.

The following panel discussion includes Marc Benioff, Founder and CEO of Salesforce.com; Andy Jassy, SVP of Amazon Web Services and Amazon Infrastructure; Paul Maritz, President and CEO of VMware and Tim O’Reilly, founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media, Inc.

The discussion is on the aspects of application independence in Cloud environments, the future direction of cloud integration technologies, and the emergence of Cloud-based operating system.

You can find the site by clicking on the Web 2.0 Summit Points of Control map below.

Analyzing SaaS Revenue Forecasts and Market Growth by Segment

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A recent report published by Standard & Poor’s Equity Research Services on the computer software industry makes for interesting reading.

Zaineb Bokhari, Application Software Analyst authored the 47-page report.  He has shown how the software industry is going through a fundamental restructuring due to the impact of SaaS, open source, and the many variations in licensing programs.

His analysis also shows how these factors taken together form a powerful catalyst of long-term disruption to business models.  At one point, the study predicts the end of perpetual licensing due to the time-to-value contributions of SaaS-based applications.  The report is available for download to Equity Research Services clients, including many college and university online libraries that have Standard & Poor’s subscriptions.

Here are the key take-aways from reading this report:

  • IDC expects the market for global packaged software to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.8% from 2009 to 2014. Over the same period, IDC projects software-as-a-service will grow at a 25.3% CAGR.

  • Standard & Poor’s reports that the SaaS category is still dwarfed by traditional packaged software, which IDC sized at $272 billion in 2009 (versus $13.1 billion for SaaS).
  • According to IDC’s forecasts, the size of the SaaS will rise from just under 5% of the size of the packaged software market in 2009 to more than 11% by 2014.
  • Standard & Poor’s expects corporate spending on enterprise software and related maintenance to grow in the low to mid-single-digit range (i.e., 3%–6%) in 2010, with some segments expanding at above-average levels.
  • Overall revenues from SaaS delivery models reached $13.1 billion in 2009, a growth rate of 34.2% from 2008 according to IDC. IDC expects this revenue to rise to $40.5 billion by 2014, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 25.3%. This is dwarfed by the $272 billion that IDC believes was spent globally on software in 2009.
  • Application development and deployment is projected to have the most rapid growth of all segments, attaining a 39.2% CAGR from 2009 – 2014. Please see the table below, Worldwide Software-as-a-Service Revenues Forecast by Segment for a year-by-year breakout of this category.
  • Infrastructure software is forecasted to grow at a 27.4% CAGR through 2014, totaling 11,345 instances by 2014 according to IDC.  The year-by-year breakouts are also included in the following table.
  • Applications are expected to have 20.4% CAGR through 2014 based in units and attain a 50.8% market share of all SaaS segments by 2014.

Bottom line: Enterprise software pricing models must change to stay in step with customers’ expectations of more value for their maintenance and licensing fees. The evolving economics of cloud and SaaS-based application deployment are in the process of permanently re-ordering enterprise software.

Flickr attribution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/8011986@N02/2964298027/in/photostream/#/

Google Cloud Technologies Overview

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Google’s efforts at App Engine evangelism continue to accelerate with the announcement of new APIs and products from Google Labs.

The complete listing of Products in Labs and Graduates of Labs are listed on the Google Code Labs site.
Where Amazon Web Services (AWS) changes many different elements of their platform, pricing, and services often, Google is taking an incremental approach to rolling out new features based on innovation and extensive work in Google Labs.

The following slide deck authored by Chris Schalk is case in point.  Included in this presentation is an update on the Google Storage, Google Prediction API, and Google Big Query.  It’s an excellent overview of these APIs and services, explaining the evolving role of Google’s cloud technologies in the process.

Key Research Challenges in Cloud Computing

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Dr. Ignacio M. Llorente leads the The DSA (Distributed Systems Architecture) Research Group at Complutense de Madrid and is one of the world’s leading lecturers and thought leaders in advanced distributed computing and virtualization technologies, architecture of large-scale distributed infrastructures and resource provisioning platforms.  His thoughts and observations on the key research challenges on cloud computing are fascinating to read over.

High Performance Computing on AWS – Keynote for SC10 by Dr. Werner Vogels, CTO of Amazon

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Dr. Werner Vogel’s pre-recorded keynote for SC10 provides insights into the early adopters of the latest generation of AWS enhancements and additions.  SC10 is the leading conference globally for high performance computing, networking, storage and analysis.

His co-presenter is Deepak Singh, Sr. Business Development Manager who describes the role of Hadoop MapReduce in the AWS strategy.  At just over eight minutes, this keynote is worth watching for the insights and updates on the latest customer and technology news on AWS .

Oracle’s 2010 Roadmap to Enterprise Cloud Computing

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At the 7th Annual Cloud Expo held earlier this month at the Santa Clara Convention Center, Rex Wang of Oracle presented his company’s 2010 roadmap to Cloud Computing.  Rex is the VP of Product Marketing with responsibility for cloud and grid computing, in addition to enterprise architecture, modernization and embedded systems.

Key take-aways from this presentation include the following:

  • 28.6% of respondents have internal or private clouds today according to an IOUG Study cited in the presentation.
  • 54.% of respondents do not use public cloud providers.
  • 24.7% use Application Server Platform as a Service, the highest percentage across PaaS and IaaS adoption from the study completed.
  • Financial & accounting (19.6%), HR (18.6%) and collaboration-based apps including e-mail (18.2%) are the three most common applications running on private cloud services

Oracle’s 2010 roadmap to Cloud Computing provides insights into how they are shaping their private cloud value proposition and selling strategy around Exadata, Exalogic, and WebLogic.  Oracle clearly sees private clouds dominating.

Bottom line: The future of cloud architectures will be much more hybrid in structure and scope, as every enterprise has legacy data that cannot be easily moved into private clouds.  Add in the complexity of aggregating and normalizing unstructured content, and the direction of cloud architectures will be more hybrid, less private, over time.

Hadoop Predicted To Be More Disruptive than Linux

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Abhishek Mehta is Managing Director for Big Data and Analytics for Bank of America, and serves as Executive in Residence at MIT Media Lab.  SiliconAngle.tv founder John Furrier and Wikibon co-founder David Vellante interviewed him at Hadoop World last month.  Abhishek sees Hadoop as being more disruptive than Linux, and leading to the formation of data factories.  He also sees Hadoop giving programmers greater freedom to concentrate on creating algorithms that solve much larger, more complex problems than is possible today.

Here is a quote from the interview:
“So these data factories are going to emerge as the new drivers of innovation of a massive revolution that will change fundamentally how business models extract value, because data is going to be, is the core asset in a multitude of industries.”

At just under 30 minutes, this is a fascinating look into the future of Hadoop.

Transcript of the interview by Bert Latamore

Source attribution: SiliconAngle.tv video

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